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WETA
Jul 5, 2012 12:30am EDT
presidential race, of course. we are glad you could join us. the conversation colin powell, coming up right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we allit's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: it is an honor to welcome colin powell back to this program. the former secretary of state and decorated four-star general is a best-selling author, whose latest book is called "it worked for me." he joins us from washington. secretary colin powell, good to have you back. >> good to be here, tavis. tavis: and a string some questions in the news, i guess that does not surprise you given the world you have played in our government that i would want to pick your brain. let me get to a statement that you made a few weeks ago that you have not made a decision yet, unless you want to break some news tonight, about the presidential election. i want to get them out of the way and did you a chance to a
WETA
Jul 20, 2012 5:30pm EDT
, does it? - i'll make us a coffee. - no, leave it ten minutes. - vicki'll just moan. - wonder what we can do in ten minutes. my bed's on its last legs since i met you. - that's you and your gut. - gut?! what gut?! - this one! - and what about your gut? it must be a rubbish bed, then. - that cost 30 quid! - get a new one. your whole room's horrible. the rug stinks, - the ceiling's filthy... - you should know, you look at it enough. - you're corrupting me. - no, you're corrupting me. but imagine how nice it'd be if we cleared it and painted it? we could do it together. i've virtually moved in, anyway. - you're doing that woman thing. - what?! saying something and meaning something else. - i ain't with you. - you want to move in, right? wouldn't be so bad, would it? don't get all moody on me. it'll be trips down the retail park next. i ain't into that. - i thought we were serious. - we are. zoe, i think you're great, but... the whole domestic scene just doesn't rattle my cage. i'm gonna skip the coffee. feeling sorry for yourself? ( humming ) oh... you're gonna use that china? yeah, it's
WETA
Jul 25, 2012 12:00am EDT
knight rises." more tonight on his life and career. we are glad you have joined us. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: so last night things were just getting good when we had to end our conversation with morgan freeman, so thankfully he stuck around for another show so we can talk about "the dark knight rises," "the magic of belle isle," two wonderful projects he has coming out, and so much more about what it means to be morgan freeman in today's world. you were saying last night at the end of the conversation that you're a bit frightened, scared was your exact word -- >> yeah. tavis: -- of the other side if we do not reelect barack obama. un >> yeah. one case in point, you look at the attempts to disenfranchise minority voters i use the term "minority" advisedly here, because the hispanic world is growing so fast th
WETA
Jul 8, 2012 10:00am EDT
look like in the future. >> ah, tunisia and led the arab spring, a bit in it, if we can use the phrase in that whole part of the world. >> absolutely. tunisia led the revolution and for me as a tunisia i think barry revolution is not done -- it is done once we reach a real democracy. that real democracy, we are building it now. , but the idea of one country leading to the end, and we of the first country now to draft a constitution, the first country that had elections and we will be the first country that will have another election by march. so, the idea ois to take this energy we had from the revolution and to take it until the day we will reach the real democracy. >> are the people optimistic? the worddon't think fits now because it is really a time of uncertainty. we don't know what is happening exactly. we are not seeing how will be the future. but if i could speak for myself, yes, i am optimistic and i have been optimistic even under ben ali's regime so it is not now i am giving up my hopes and optimism. i am optimistic because i see people fighting every day in that country to m
WETA
Jul 22, 2012 10:30am EDT
with us. religious groups are among those expressing sorrow and outrage over the shooting massacre at a colorado movie theater on friday. president obama called for a day of prayer and reflection for the victims and their families. in other news, as the international community continued to wrestle over a response to the growing violence in syria, religious leaders intensified their calls for more humanitarian aid and an end to the crisis. a catholic archbishop inside syria urged world leaders to "speak with one voice" in order to bring about peace. meanwhile, the united nations says the number of syrian refugees has nearly tripled since april to more than 100,000. u.s. civil rights groups this week filed a federal lawsuit challenging an unmanned drone attack that killed three american citizens in yemen last october. extremist cleric an war al awlaki, his son and samir khan, a propagandist for al qaeda were all killed in the american drone strike. the u.s. says the mission was part of the war against terror. but the civil rights groups say these were targeted assassinations of u.s. citiz
WETA
Jul 1, 2012 10:30am EDT
. >> welcome. i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. several major decisions from the supreme court this week. five of the nine justices voted to uphold president obama's healthcare law, saying the law's individual mandate is legal. religious groups were divided over the legislation. some had called healthcare reform a "mol imperative" while others worried the law would allow federally funded abortions. faith communities had also lobbied hard around arizona's immigration law. on monday, the court struck down three parts of that legislation. but, it left in place the requirement that local police check the immigration status of people they believe could be in the country illegally. in another case, the justices ruled against mandatory sentences of life without parole for juveniles convicted of murder. they said courts should have discretion about imposing that punishment. for more on the religious reaction to these decisions, patricia zapor of catholic news service is here and so is kim lawton managing editor of this program. welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> pat, the healt
WETA
Jul 29, 2012 10:30am EDT
have you with us. thousands of political leaders, doctors and activists gathered in washington this week for the biannual international aids conference, held for the first time in the u.s. in more than 20 years. at a georgetown university summit timed to the conference, religious groups highlighted the role of faith-based efforts in combating the disease internationally. mega church pastor rick warren urged churches to work with diverse coalitions in the fight. >> i don't have to agree with everything you do to work with you on things we can work on. >>> widespread mourning continues for the victims of last week's mass shooting at a colorado movie theater. several congregations held vigils for the 12 people who were killed and the more than 50 who were wounded. many churches also had chaplains on hand to counsel the grieving. religious leaders condemned the shooting as a senseless and evil act. others say it points to the need for stricter gun control laws. >>> a new survey from the pew forum on religion & public life found that voters continue to want a president with strong religi
WETA
Jul 25, 2012 12:00pm EDT
which was prepared to fight for it, so to us, that was a recipe for disaster, and something which could cause major trouble in syria and beyond. that is buy what i have been saying let's stop this policy of sort of frontal attack on the government and let's try to put it together and one missing link in this whole setup so far, including kofi annan's effort is the opposition, numerous pleas to them and numerous conversations with them in various formats, very few have dialogue with the government. >> rose: we conclude this evening with kurt andersen, the novelist and author of true believers. >> i have never read a book about the late sixties that did two things i wanted to do, one, show how the early -- how the lives in the early sixties became lives in the late sixties, how adolescents who went from 12 to 18 in exactly that decade, how that worked, and then i was also interested in looking back at it from the future, so it skips back and forth from the present to the past, to have some, a long view of what was that all about. >> rose: vitaly churkin and kurt andersen when we con
WETA
Jul 25, 2012 6:00pm EDT
there to help crush a rebel advance. the obama administration has condemned the use of attack helicopters in the area. our correspondent and cameramen are there and send this report. >> they have been celebrating victory in part of aleppo city. it is certainly premature. the rebels and residents say they have reason to cheer. >> the rebels have brought us here to show some of the damage they have brought against the government tanks. a design of the -- it is a sign of some of the fierce fighting that has taken place. this is what has happened to the army's first counter-attack. that does not mean the rebels have won. they say they control 70% of the city. that is unlikely. the view from state tv is very different. >> in a roundup of troubled spots, it said government forces could gain the upper hand across syria. this is what state tv is not showing. what activist says is the city being pounded. nor are they showing the shelling anin homs. we cannot verify this footage. residents tried to get children to safety. it appears to be a gruesome discovery. the media activist whose f
WETA
Jul 13, 2012 6:30pm EDT
analyst fred cannon tells us why he's still recommending j.p. morgan stock and what to expect in the second half of the year. >> susie: and you may be one of millions of americans getting a health care rebate. we'll tell you why. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" >> tom: j.p. morgan's trading mess lost much more money than first thought-- nearly $6 billion. that's almost triple the original estimate. still, the nation's biggest bank still managed to post a $5 billion profit in the second quarter. including items, earnings per share were $1.21, while down from a year ago, that's well above wall street estimates. suzanne pratt has the story. >> reporter: j.p. morgan had so much news to explain to wall street it held a two-hour analysts meeting here at company headquarters today after it released its earnings report. here's what c.e.o. jamie dimon had to say about the bank's big blunder. >> we are not proud of this moment, but we are proud of our company. we are not making light of this error, but we do think this it's an isolated event. one of the reasons you do hold capit
WETA
Jul 10, 2012 12:00am EDT
help us understand the extraordinary announcement coming out of geneva last week about understanding matter. >> it's an elusive, invisible stuff. you don't see it. you have to find some way to access it. and the proposal-- which now seems to bear fruit-- is if you slam protons together, other particles, at very, very high speed, which is what happens with the large had dron collider. >> rose: and you can only do that with a collider like this. >> exactly. and you can sometimes jig this will invisible... sometimes flick out a little speck of this molasses, which would be a higgs particle. so people look for that little speck of a particle and now there's evidence that it has been found. >> it is the thing that explains to us how our fundamental particles got mass and it's a piece of the puzzle and now that we have this we can move on from here and maybe it isn't even a standard model higgs. maybe it's something more exotic. that remains to be seen. >> rose: what would be another big question this might help us understand? >> well, there are a number of questions. one of the questions
WETA
Jul 9, 2012 4:00pm EDT
forgotten the "and under." >> is there a cellar under here? >> as old as the house. there used to be wood all over the floor down-- that's brunton's muffler, i'd swear to it. >> watson. [dramatic music] ♪ >> inspector. this is a friend of mine, dr. watson. >> inspector, i have some experience in forensic pathology. the man has been dead for two days. cause of death: suffocation. >> no wound or bruise on his person, sir? >> none. >> accident, eh? >> oh, there's no doubt about it. he must have been down there alone, and the flagstone just fell shut on him, poor fellow. >> sir reginald, i'm told that your butler was down in the cellar in an unused part of the house. what was his business there, sir? >> a butler's duties are many and varied, inspector. i can't possibly answer that question. >> well, no one would have heard his cries for help in that part of the house. that is the point, surely, inspector. >> [screams] >> tregallis. >> rachel! she done it! she killed him! that's why she run away! >> tregallis. >> rachel? >> it's nothing. the servants are naturally upset. >> well, who is this
WETA
Jul 20, 2012 7:00pm EDT
recent story about smart meters used to monitor energy use. spencer michels reports on california activists who want to ban them. >> pacific gas & electric one of the nation's largest utilities has had to fight a coalition of people who suspect, among other things, that smart meters may be bad for your health. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: once again today, americans absorbed the news of a mass shooting-- a dozen dead, at least 59 hurt or wound. it happened inheof cy it aurora, just east of denver, where a movie theater erupted in late
WETA
Jul 29, 2012 6:00pm EDT
for all of us to hear, but especially those of us who have never been in combat. karl marlantes, a small-town boy from oregon, the son of a soldier, a graduate of yale, landed in vietnam in october 1968, and was placed in charge of t n,platoo charlie company, 1st battalion, 4th marine regiment. one year later he came home with two purple hearts, the navy cross, the bronze star, ten air medals, and memories that screamed at him. he finished his degree in philosophy at oxford on a rhodes scholarship and spent the next 30 years in business, all the while wrestling with the demons that came home with him. finally, in the late '90s, he asked the veterans administration for help, and began treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. two years ago he published a novel. he had been working on it ever since he came home from vietnam, "matterhorn," the story of a young 2nd lieutenant leading a rifle platoon of 40 marines on a remote jungle hill. critics called it "a powerhouse. tense, brutal honest," "unforgettable," "moving and intense." karl marlantes has now written a second book, a non
WETA
Jul 1, 2012 10:00am EDT
trust. thank you so much for sitting with us. >> thank you for having me. >> what brought you to the attention of the government over there in yemen? >> i would like to say they did not really pay attention to me as an activist and a woman because they did not pay attention to women in a country, and that as a privilege because we can do our own activism and spoke -- focus more on our work. but when they contacted me, they said that this is what we need to do. they were watching what hosni mubarak was doing in egypt and were thinking what we -- what needed to be done. but they've were not honest with that. they just wanted to observe the anger. so, that did not work. i would answer your questions setting it is social media. i was working as a journalist g. i have been working as a journalist for six years and i never heard a comment from them, but once i started using social media as a journalist and i started to share the information i had and the documents i had, that is how they paid attention. >> what were you posting? what were you saying on your reporting on the internet? >
WETA
Jul 20, 2012 8:00pm EDT
wealth. >> tax havens, offshore accounts, mitt romney has used every trick in the book. gwen: and republicans make the case that the president is out of touch. >> i wish this president would learn how to be an american. gwen: meanwhile, the u.s. and the u.n. work to force syrian president assad from power, as the civil wars there build. covering the week, pierre thomas of abc news, karen tumulty of "the washington post," jeff zeleny of "the new york times" and doyle doyle of the mcmanus of "the los angeles times." >> covering history as it happens, live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875 we've been there for our clients through good times and bad. when their needs changed, we were there to meet them. through the years from insurance to invest management, from real estate to retirement solutions, we've developed new ideas for the financial challenges ahead. this rock has never stood still. and th
WETA
Jul 27, 2012 1:00am EDT
wanted us to ask long ago. >> rose: i had a quote from you. >> okay. >> rose:. >> always dangerous. >> rose: to secure the source of reform achieved in the 20th century socialism and communism require doing more going -- require doing more, going further than reform is anywhere understood. >> right. that is my point. i think that if we take our own country as an example, we did extraordinary things in the 1930s in the face of a crisis, even worse than the one we are in now. you know, we are not we are now talking about making less social security, people have to remember in the depths of the depression is when we created social security. when everyone said there is no money to do such things as they are saying it now, roosevelt came and created a social security system, creates an unemployment compensation system, creates a federal employment program that filled 12 and a half million jobs between mean 34 and mean 41, all of the things that we are told today -- >> rose: and got everybody back to work. >> finally but a lot was done even before, my point is everything that was done is
WETA
Jul 22, 2012 6:00pm EDT
publicly denouncing the 2003 invasion of iraq. in such books as "war is a force that gives us meaning," his weekly column for the website "truthdig" and freelance articles for a variety of other publications, chris hedges has taken his life's experience covering the brutality of combat and shaped a world view in which morality and faith, and the importance of truth-telling, dissent and social activism take precedence, even if it means going to jail. welcome, chris hedges. >> thank you. >> tell me about joe sacco. he was your companion on this trip. and he was your, in effect, co-author. although he was sketching instead of writing. >> i've known joe since the war in bosnia. we met when he was working on his book, "gorazde." and i was not a reader of graphic novels. but i watched him work. and i certainly know a brilliant journalist when i see one. and he is one of the most brilliant journalists i've ever met. he reports it out with such depth and integrity and power, and then he draws it out. and i realized that an extremely important component of this book was making visible these invisibl
WETA
Jul 4, 2012 11:30pm EDT
, suggestions, and information on "a capitol fourth," visit us at information on "a capitol fourth," visit us at pbs.org/capitolfourth. its auto insurance customers for over 70 years. more information on auto insurance at geico.com or 1-800-947-auto any time of the day or night. >> rose: welcome to the program, we talk about the american presidency with five historians and presidential biographers, they are doris kearns good wins, jon meacham, robert caro, james fallows. >> what about the president, obama is the living proof that, you know, we talk about a narrative, what is obama's place right now in the american narrative? that he is the first african-american president, so 43 years ago, blacks still did not vote in substantial numbers in the south. >> i mean, he made a lot of talk about theodore roosevelt and learned lessons from fdr and from the do nothing congress of harry fru man, you see right in this campaign, i think the most important thing that jim fallows talked about in the great atlantic piece is his ability to learn from mistakes and to change as time goes by and if he does
WETA
Jul 4, 2012 6:00pm EDT
particle which may be the use of so-called god particle, the higgs boson, and it may be time to put the champagne in the refrigerator. >> it is a discovery about the fabric of the universe that will go down as one of the greatest in science. in a giant underground facility near geneva, observers have found the key to matter. in the circular tunnel, they have identified a new kind of particle, as predicted nearly 50 years ago by a british professor, peter higgs. today, he was in geneva, at an emotional announcement of the discovery of the higgs boson. >> i want to congratulate everyone on this tremendous achievement. for me, this is really an incredible thing that happened in my lifetime. [applause] >> the scientists hunted for it by firing particles through the tunnel and forcing them to collide to reveal their inner workings. alternately, this is a very basic question, to understand what the universe is made out of, how from empty space we get the planets and us, going deeper and deeper to particles so tiny, it is not clear how they had any kind of substance, and that is where this par
WETA
Jul 14, 2012 6:30pm EDT
narrative is supposed to be about how obama is presenting us with job-killing tax cuts, the c.b.o. came out with a report that said effective tax rates have fallen to a 30-year low under obama, surprisingly. a lot of that was the economy. and people losing income and falling into a lower tax bracket. but people forget. the stem luss did in fact cut taxes -- the stimulus did in fact cut taxes. and what you saw happened on the bush tax cuts, it was really interesting. because in 2010, they didn't want to have this fight. they did not want to talk about raising taxes on the wealthy. even on the wealthy before the 2010 election. they were nervous about it. but this year, they seemed to feel like they got two thirds of the people -- two thirds of america say they want to see the middle class tax cuts extended. people do not want to see tax cuts for the rich extended. and they have decided that they got a winning message and they're going to lean into it this time. gwen: there's another piece, i'll stay with you on this. because this also happened on capitol hill which is the health care piec
WETA
Jul 19, 2012 6:30pm EDT
%. so, will that change in the rest of the year? joining us now to talk about the outlook for m&a, bob profusek, chairman of the global m&a practice at jones day. >> bob, you were responsible for two mergers today, including that c p&g deal we just mentioned. do you see more deals picking up the rest of this year? >> it's actually a pretty good deal environment. the numbers are down year over year, but the first half of 20 len wa2011 was very active. and at&t and stx t mobile for example. this is an active market, but like the economy in general, it lacks some animal instinct. there aren't those huge headline grabbing deals that i frequently see. not a lot of home runs, but plenty of singles and doubles. >> susie: what would you say about the deals i mentioned? it seems more strategic in nature than the big transformational deals you just mentioned. >> they are. they're kind of asset redeployment deals. ppg and georgia gulf, for example, those are two chemical companies coming together. it's a complex structure. ppg spins its business off and merges into georgia gulf. engineered a
WETA
Jul 15, 2012 10:00am EDT
celebrated for south africa. tell us a bit about it. >> freedom day comes as a hard one for the overwhelming majority who, by definition, are the black party. it comes as the result of a long hard stratifies and struggles. it comes after long years of imprisonment for nelson mandela. it comes for -- comes after 50 years of exile for many south africans. and it comes after years of arkansas association, of national unity, and forgiveness. -- years of segregation, working for national unity and forgiveness. >> turn the clock back a little bit for us and tell us a little bit about growing up in south africa in the 1960's and 1970's. >> my recollections are far more in the 1970's. but i can into south africa in the 1970's were my parents had been absolutely distant. is the ticket in which nelson mandela would go to jail. -- is the decade in which nelson mandela would go to jail. when many would go into exile. there is the killing of people in places like soweto. the assassination of the president of the african national congress. people go into the 1970's in a very fearful moment. t
WETA
Jul 24, 2012 12:00pm EDT
treasury, tim geithner. >> i think these two clouds over us, one is the impact of europe on growth here around the world and how they manage the crisis and the second is a broader concern about whether the political institutions of the country are going to find a boy to move again, to govern again, become unstuck and do something good for the economy in the long run, i think this concern about washington being stuck got much more scary last summer when we had the crisis over the debt limit because you had large part of one party threatening to default, first time in history. >> rose: geithner for the hour next. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. captioning sponsored by rose communications >> tonight the special edition of charlie rose. >> rose: tim geithner is here the united states secretary of the treasury, the longest member of obama's economic team, part of the nation's response to the crisis dating back to his tenure of his tenure a at the new york federal reserve he has seen a range of measures to both protect and stimulate growth, today the economy sits
WETA
Jul 16, 2012 5:00pm EDT
this explains why i wanted to talk to sheila bair. she's a hero to many of us for her long fight for an honest and accountable banking system. after years working on capitol hill, at the treasury department, the new york stock exchange and the commodity futures trading commission, she was appointed by president george w. bush to head the federal deposit insurance corporation, the fdic. now as senior advisor to the pew charitable trust, sheila bair has just organized a private group of financial experts called the systemic risk council. among its members, former fed chairman paul volcker, former senators bill bradley and alan simpson, john reed, once the chairman of citigroup, and brooksley born, the former cftc chairman who back in the 1990s accurately predicted an economic meltdown. its mission, to prevent the banking industry from scuttling the reforms created by the dodd-frank act, and, hopefully, prevent another crash. she has a book coming out in late september about the need for reform called "taking the bull by the horns." she's also written two books for children about mo
WETA
Jul 10, 2012 7:00pm EDT
provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the past 12 months are the warmest ever recorded in the united states since record keeping began in 1895. that word comes as a new report from the national oceanic and atmospheric administration today says climate change, including human factors, has increased the odds of extreme weather. ( sirens ) the severe storms that finally broke the deadly heat wave in the united states blew in with their own set of dangers this week. in greensboro, north carolina, residents are struggling to recover from flooding and power outages brought on by slow moving storms yesterday. in fredericksburg, virginia, violent thunderstorms pummeled a cheer
WETA
Jul 12, 2012 12:00am EDT
the barrow group and she -- he had a quarter in his hand and each one of us tried to get the quarter from him. and we all completely failed. and then he said, okay and he gave the quarter to one person and said now keep the quarter away from me. and the person said okay and she attacked their hand, i mean tackled them and got the quarter out of their hand in two seconds, he said you have to fight, that is what a scene is about, you have to figure out what the quarter is and give that much energy going for it. >> and we continue with judi dench. >> don't think you have got to play every aspect of a part in every scene of a character. you just play one small bit of it, and then the next scene you can concentrate on another and the next and then at the end, maybe you will have presented the whole character. which is a very good tip to learn, because you get so anxious, i was madder than your box of frogs, you know, but i know now i only needed one way of saying she was mad. >> rose: we continue this evening also with tilda swinton. >> remain open and free and relaxed and up for
WETA
Jul 26, 2012 3:30am EDT
. >> it's going to be, probably, at least a $7 or $8 billion investment just to get us up and running. >> narrator: john shively became ceo of the pebble partnership in 2008. his job is to guide the project through the long permitting process. >> we think the resource probably would last for a 100 years or more of mining, but we're not going to try to permit a mine that's a hundred years long. >> narrator: this is the valley where the mine would be built, 15 miles from lake iliamna. >> it's a very complicated project. i mean, it's a mine, a significant-sized mine. it's an 86-mile road. it's a brand new major port, and it's a power project. any one of those four would require full environmental impact statements. so making all those pieces fit, both in terms of the environment and then economically and operationally, is not easy. >> a mine in this area is very complicated. there are a lot of moving parts, and you have to really look at every one of those closely. >> narrator: ken taylor is a wildlife biologist who is in charge of pebble's environmental studies. >> if we can't coexist w
WETA
Jul 10, 2012 6:00pm EDT
how you use that cudgel because it could spark a very adverse reaction with the egyptians and make things worse rather than better. i think our attitude has been correct towards egypt right now. president obama and secretary clinton. we want them to move forward and resolve these issues, but we also have an obligation to our taxpayers as well. >> let's talk about syria. kofi annan said that iran can play a positive role and should there be -- should therefore be part of the solution in the syrian crisis. can you imagine the u.s. working with iran to stop the bloodshed in syria? >> they have had people on the ground, as you know, if they lose syria, in the words of our general and head of our central command said it will be the greatest blow to iran in 25 years. it is far more likely we would get cooperation from russia, and that certainly is questionable, that would be from iran. this is looking more and more like mr. anon is getting more and more desperate and various of his plans have failed and it is becoming almost ludicrous, the state is that he makes. now i understand there i
WETA
Jul 13, 2012 12:05am EDT
or call us at 1-800-play-pbs. captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org cumming: masterpiece is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from... we are pbs. >> rose: it is summertime and we look back at some of the interesting people who havave ce to our table, including these people who are scientists or write about science. we begin with the edward o. wilson. >> we know now looking at it with clearer eyes that group versus group is an absolutely fundamental and overpowering the phenomenon in human behavior. it was enough to drive whatever groups were actually driving and what it was driving was altruism and what we call the traits of virtue, that is, compassion, willingness to cooperate. >> rose: and continue with eric kandel. >> we are beginning to understand how people use both their conscious and unconscious mental processes to respond to a work of art. we can outline a scheme of the various steps that are involved in looking at a great painting and having a perceptual response, an emotional response and empathic response to it and we can outline i
WETA
Jul 3, 2012 1:00am EDT
. we are glad you could join us, coming up right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: joan walsh serves as an editor at large at salon.com, and she is also -- also the author of attacks called "what's the matter went -- also the author of "what's the matter with white people." >> thanks, tavis. tavis: what is the book about >> it is about the nostalgia that people have that never fully existed. it was great for some people. we did build a wonderful middle class, will be excluded a lot of people from the dream. and when we extended the american dream to all americans, non-white people, things started to fall apart, and i think there is kind of a mistaken cause and effect. it was as if something fell apart because we try to extend posterity to more people. -- prosperity to new people. it became a deeply divisive issue. t
WETA
Jul 26, 2012 1:00am EDT
fascinated -- for those of us who are fans of yours, there is so much to learn about the back story to carole king. i assume you're okay talking about it because you wrote about it. let me put it as a question this way -- how much of your success today has to do with your brother? >> interesting question. my brother was intellectually disabled and he left the home and went into a place where they could take better care of him. they were more specialized. i felt the onus on me to be really excellent at everything to make up for what he could not do, so it definitely informed my life and my career. tavis: that comes through pretty loud and clear at the beginning, that you felt like you needed to step your game up, but for a person who was as young as you were, that's a lot of pressure to put on yourself. >> probably, but i did not see it as pressure. i just did it. does that make sense? it was, like, i did not have the pressure, i have got to be great, i have got to be excellent. i just felt the drive to do that and consequently was. it wasn't like i have to do this or something might
WETA
Jul 1, 2012 6:00pm EDT
our emancipation as any thing that has ever been advanced against us," for it had " sunk deep into the hearts of millions of the whites, and never will be removed this side of eternity." so, the ideal of equality jefferson proclaimed, he also betrayed. he got it right when he wrote about "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness." as the core of our human aspirations. but he lived it wrong, denying to others the rights he claimed for himself. and that's how jefferson came to embody the oldest and longest war of all -- the war between the self and the truth, between what we know and how we live. so enjoy the fireworks and flags, the barbecues and bargain sales. but hold this thought as well -- that behind this fourth of july holiday are human beings who were as flawed and conflicted as they were inspired. if they were to look upon us today they most likely would think as they did then, how much remains to be done. with those contradictions of american history in mind, this seemed a good time to talk with khalil gibran muhammad. he's made them his life's work. muhammad grew up on c
WETA
Jul 18, 2012 12:00pm EDT
a leukemia doctor. >> it has been an interesting interaction between the two of us. i am his physician but i am also his boss. i am his colleague. i was involved in his recruitment as a fellow and then as a faculty member. i work closely with his mentors, who are really invested in him and completely committed to his success. so it is almost -- it is almost an objection more reason in, oxymoron in medicine but it is almost like a family affair .. the. >> we conclude with "the new york times" hong kong bureau chief, keith bradsher. >> one of the lucky things about being in hong kong, i don't go to beijing very often and all over the rest of the china, and the further from beijing the more you run into that nationallyism, nationalism and the zero more you run into people that say china should be more assertive in pursuing its foreign policy. >> rose: the future of cancer treatment and the future of china when we continue. infugnd funding for charlie ros provided by the following. >> captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie r
WETA
Jul 2, 2012 7:00pm EDT
. >> it's important to communicate science because science is surrounding us. we swim in an ocean of science. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: power grids in the eastern u.s. struggled to rebuild today, even as new storms did new damage overnight. the death toll reached 22 killed in six states since friday, and for many thousands of others, there was only stifling heat and no air conditioning. for a third day, utility crews logged long hours to restore power to some two million customers. for a third day many endured long hours of misery after losing power in violent storms that struck fri
WETA
Jul 3, 2012 12:00am EDT
china. >> rose: you used to say to me, many times, that when you, bill gates went to china, they sucked everything they could get out of you in terms of what you thought and what they could learn from you, correct? >> yeah, both countries are very good-- . >> rose: the indian does the same. >> yeah, both countries have looked at the uchlts is and what it does well. including having really strong universities, including having sort of capitallistic markets. and they've moved in that direction. and in fact their growth comes from that fact. china is dramatic because it was very anti-market until 1979. and then all of a sudden it opened up, brought it a lot of foreign technology so they were way behind india. and then they really went full bore. india has done reforms and every time it does reforms it gets some growth out of that. and the expectation is that will continue. so they both benefitted immensely from looking at the west and looked at what allowed the great success in the west. >> rose: but do you see restrictions on china because there's less freedom of expression, say, than the
WETA
Jul 16, 2012 12:00pm EDT
know you love golf like i do. >> i do. >> we're going talk about every aspect. i want to us look at this book too. this is called the pro. a lessons from my father claude harmon, senior. what de teach. >> you know, i think pretty much everything i know about its game started with my father. my father was so far ahead of his time he was a club pro that won a major championship. he won a masters in 1948. the last club pro to ever win. >> wing foot. >> and at sell follow and down at palm beach. and he was a person that was a great player, great teacher, great innovater. de so many things, teaching aids, using film before there was video. he had this insight and this way of dissecting what was wrong with something that made everything so simple. and i think one of the reasons myself and my three younger brothers have all been successful as instructors is growing up in our family. watching our father 9 way he taught, the way he handled different people. it didn't matter whether you were ben hoggan his best friend, it didn't matter whether you were henry ford t didn't matter whether you w
WETA
Jul 24, 2012 6:00pm EDT
further, with firsthand accounts forces have used fighter jets to bomb the city of aleppo. rebel fighters launched an offensive to try to get control of the area from the army. our correspondent and cameraman are there and have the very latest. >> it is the islamic month of ramadan, so when the sun goes down, another day of fighting, and in syria, the rebel army comes out to fight. we joined a convoy on a highly dangerous mission to aleppo, headlights off to avoid being seen, passing under the nose of government troops and into serious second city, where the insurgency has found its love this voice -- its loudest voice. many here are desperate for the rebels suit -- to succeed, clamoring for freedom denied by their president, but as the rebels take over this district, what many fear they will see is an osmotic takeover that will unleash a whirlwind of division and bloodshed across the region. hundreds, perhaps as many as 1000, rebel fighters have pushed into this part of aleppo city. as you can see, they have set up barricades. there is fear that reinforcements will be there. by
WETA
Jul 4, 2012 12:00pm EDT
together and they share o and they are both in that trilogy of us, worked really well together and i don't know, it is just an amazing role to play and dive into. >> rose: it is a perfect life for them until -- >> it really is. >> i until that time, yes. >> rose: and you play? >> i play elena, elena is very conservative housewife from mexico, and he is very devoted to her family and she has -- her husband is murdered and her twin sons are murdered, so she has been forced to take over the family business, which is the cartel of mexico, and she was very successful, he is a very successful businesswoman. >> and her business is? >> her business is drugs. >> rose: and when she sees somebody else in her business she wants their business as well? >> if they are very, very good, yes. >> rose: and then along comes dennis. >> oh, yes. >> well, let's see. den space duplicitous, crooked dea agent and he has his own agenda, and he is on both sides of the fence. he is serving the mention cab cartel, mexican cartel as well as the u.s. government and these young guys that have this very successful m
WETA
Jul 28, 2012 6:00pm EDT
, wherein he said "you didn't build that." the president tells us he did not mean what his republican opponents say he meant, that he is anti-small business. let's start with governor romney in london. how is he doing so far, mark? >> it has not worked out according to schedule, but he has taken to ma -- too many cheap shots. this does not rise to the level of "corporations are people," "i like being able to fire people." let the gaffes begin. >> nina? >> he violated a cardinal rule, that i guess it should not -- a guest not criticize the brits. having said that, i do not think this is that big a deal. it is not as if he committed a cardinal sin. >> americans may not think it is a big deal, but the british do, charles. >> they do, and he missed a gimme. all he has to do on the trip abroad is to say nothing. he chose britain, poland, and israel, because each of them has a history with this administration of being disssed. all he has to do is show up -- woody allen said it is 80% of life -- and show friendship and trust, and he will be a contest to obama. inexplicable, what he did, and
WETA
Jul 21, 2012 6:00pm EDT
sin? >> we are asking god to send us the rain we need. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> bain capital, of sourcing, short tracks offshore tax accounts, tax returns. mitt romney has been on the defensive even though the issue on which he chooses to run, the economy, runs a slow pace. at has been about romney's bain capital and his refusal to release tax returns even though some republicans want him to do so. >> romney has released just one full year of his tax returns. >> he has no one in new to blame, he is out of touch with what is happening in the country and that is why in november we will put him out of office. >> why doesn't romney just released the tax returns, charles? >> gordo, you are killing me. this is the week where obama makes the gaffe of the year and you lead with the taxes? look, i will play along. this is an arm of the dnc, but i will play along. [laughter] john mccain released two years, and john kerry -- terry's wife, who, as willie sutton would say, is where the money is, never released any. >> nina? >> obama released eight years,
WETA
Jul 11, 2012 7:00pm EDT
piece. he joins us now from the "washington post" newsroom. spencer, welcome. so this investigation of forensics mainly was triggered by flawed hair analysis, is that right? >> that's right, judy. the concern has been building for decades really, that hair and other forensic disciplines have not had the scientific research to i guess validate or underpin their approach n. the case of hair, skeptics have raised the point that it might be subjective, given hair examiner, two different examiners might describe the same hair in different ways, the same examiner might describe it differently at different times. there was no agreement on how many characters it had to be alike for there to be a match declared. there was no population studies or statistics to answer the question of how often the hairs of two different people might appear to be the same or how often a given number of characteristics might match. to resolve these questions the f.b.i. has long said that a hair machl only shows that you can exclude two people, my hair might not look like your hair, but it can only say that a ha
WETA
Jul 5, 2012 3:00am EDT
, and i got the job. and i thought, "this was great." i was a quant. a quant uses statistical methods to try to predict patterns in the market. >> narrator: her work was used to predict when big pension funds would buy or sell so the firm could jump in ahead of their trades. >> i just felt like i was doing something immoral. i was taking advantage of people i don't even know whose retirements were in these funds. we all put money into our 401(k)s. and wall street takes this money and just skims off, like, a certain percentage every quarter. at the very end of somebody's career, they retire and they get some of that back. this is this person's money, and it's just basically going to... to wall street. just doesn't seem right. >> everybody kind of knows in their heart that something's not right. but once you are making money for a while, you don't ever want to stop making money. >> narrator: caitlin kline came to wall street in 2004. she says it was all very seductive. >> your whole first summer is taken up with things like golf lessons and negotiation classes, wine tastings, things make s
WETA
Jul 12, 2012 6:30pm EDT
web giant's turnaround plan. joining us now, scott kessler, senior equity analyst at s&p capital i.q. you know, scott, this company is one thing or another. you say that things are stabilizing at yahoo. tell us why. >> we think so, susie. if you think of the last year, the company has had i think four ceos. it's really astounding. and actually haven't decided on a permanent ceo. the krntd acting ceo is ross levinson has been in the company two years. we think the company would be best suited to put him in that chair. we think he has brought a lot of the stability that you refer to to the company. he has a steady hand. he has experience, and he's well likeed and respected across the industry. in addition, they've done a number of content partnerships as of late, and announced that they're actually moving forward on selling part of a stake in the chinese internet conglomerate. >> susie: you know, since you brought up the subject of management and ross levinson. put up a graphic to remind everybody how many ceos they've had going back to terry simmel, and then the founder jerry wang who
WETA
Jul 17, 2012 6:30pm EDT
have some arrows in their quiver, but they don't have a lot. what could they do? they could use communication, they could extend the period over which they expect to keep short-term rates low. to help hold down long rates. they could do another asset purchase program, that could squeeze down long-term rates a bit. but there's not a ton of things that they can do, and there's certainly no pan asee a, no magic wand they can wave to make the economy great. if there were such a thing they would have used it already. >> susie: there still is the question that if the fed does have to intervene, when might they do it. do you see something happening this year, maybe at the july meeting or at their august fed conference in jackson hole? >> i think it obviously depends on the evolution of the economy and so on. i don't think they're right on the cusp of doing something again, they just extended the maturity extension program at the last fomc meeting. but if the economy doesn't start to show some signs of gaining a little momentum and some of these down side risks are still out there, i th
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